Mount Sinai St. Luke's Roosevelt Hospital Center

The Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Emergency Department is located in Morningside Heights, next to the undergraduate campus of Columbia University. St. Luke’s is an ACS Level 2 Trauma Center, STEMI center, stroke center and Sexual Assault Referral Center. The ED cares for over 100,000 patients yearly, including 20,000 pediatric patients in a separate Emergency Medicine staffed pediatric ED.

The pediatric emergency department at St. Luke's Hospital treats patients from the neonatal period until the 22nd birthday. Our faculty includes dedicated pediatric attendings who are board certified in pediatrics, pediatric emergency medicine, and/or or pediatric intensive care.

REBOA: A Precious (Life)line A 25-year-old male is brought in by EMS with a gunshot wound. Vital signs are as follows: HR 130 BPM, BP 60/palp, RR 24, SpO2 99% RA, and temperature 37.5 Celsius. He app
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Shift Fatigue At the 11th Hour We have all felt it. The fatigue. The hunger. The hazy fog that ensues 11 hours into our shift. How does the average physician react in times of mental exhaustion? Do w
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Approach to Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome A 43-year-old homeless Hispanic male presents to the emergency department (ED) complaining of generalized pain and weakness. On exam he is anxious, diaphoretic
ED-ECMO: Coming Soon to an ED Near You A 52-year-old man experiences crushing sub-sternal chest pain while walking through the mall and slumps to the floor. EMS performs an EKG and notes tombstone ST
Foreign Travelers: Cutaneous Parasitic Infections from Abroad Case Presentation You step into the room of a 22-year-old female sent from her primary care physician for incision and drainage of two fa
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Critical Care Research Database - 2015 Edition This research database is a comprehensive resource through which students, residents and fellows can develop a sound understanding of major topics in th
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X: The Toxidrome Note: Incorrect author information appeared in the print edition and has been corrected here. We apologize for the error and confusion. A 24-year-old female is brought into your ED b
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The Value of Variety The knowledge base required for clinical expertise in emergency medicine is immense. Even after decades of practice, it is still routine to hear seasoned emergency physicians mak
Unconventional Embolisms Case. A 26-year-old female presents to your ED with four days of fever, shortness of breath (SOB), cough, and substernal chest pain.  In two previous visits over the same tim
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Small, but Deadly: Part 2 Remember that 22-month-old girl from the last issue? Well, armed with the information from the last article, you now  feel ready to treat any of her potential medication ing