University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

The UC Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Cincinnati has been an independent academic unit within the College of Medicine since 1984. It is responsible for the medical direction of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Center for Emergency Care (CEC) and the Emergency Medicine Residency Training Program.

The UC Department of Emergency Medicine features the oldest residency training program in the United States and was founded in 1970. The UC Emergency Medicine department has enjoyed a reputation of excellence in the field for over 45 years and continues to attract top medical students. Nationally recognized faculty are leaders in clinical teaching and research.

As the first Emergency Medicine Resident Training Program established in 1970, our program attracts the country’s top medical students. We are proud of our clinical environments and happy to work in the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. The faculty of UC Emergency Physicians staff the Emergency Departments of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center (75,000 visits/year; 49% of direct admissions), the Jewish Hospital (30,500 visits/year; 79% of direct admissions), and the West Chester Hospital (42,000 visits/year; 65% of direct admissions) – total 147,500 patient visits/year.

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Man vs Machine Computer screens burn my eyes. But patients expectantly staring at me from a distance while I interact with a machine is even more uncomfortable. Entering medicine, I envisioned spendi
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The Why, and the What's Next I'm on the four-year plan. Four years of high school was followed by four years of college. This was followed by four years of medical school, and then four years of resi
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The Common Vernacular “Dude, he talked to me today!” I couldn't help but express my joy in what seemed to be a milestone achievement for our struggling 5-year-old ICU patient. For weeks he had been b
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Taking it Slow We all experience different things in residency and come away with different perspectives, but there are a few things we all share in training. A constant sense of pressure and the nee
What's the Diagnosis? Case 1. The Patient A 44-year-old male with a history of upper extremity DVT and MRSA positivity presents with a constant, throbbing left wrist and forearm pain. He denies any t
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Unexpected Discoveries: The Not-So-Incidental Radiographic Finding As the use of imaging modalities continues to increase in frequency, the incidence of unexpected radiographic findings continues to