Browsing: Critical Care

The evidence surrounding ECPR continues to build. In this study, investigators demonstrated a 31.5% survival rate with favorable 180-day neurological outcome with ECPR in patients who suffered out-of-
Ultrasound is a powerful tool in the emergency department for the estimation of left ventricular ejection fractions. E-Point Septal Separation is a good way to obtain these measurements, but what if t
Post-resuscitation shock occurs in 50-70% of patients after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, and this study provides evidence that norepinephrine is likely a preferable vasopressor to epinephrine in po
The need for a central line is commonplace in the emergency department and critical care units. When deciding which of the three typical sites (internal jugular, femoral, and subclavian) to choose for
Esophageal rupture is a rare condition that is recognized as one of the most fatal gastrointestinal injuries. Time to diagnosis is an independent predictor of mortality in acute esophageal rupture mak
The emergent airway is central to emergency medicine. And a new study explores medications central to emergency endotracheal intubation. Which is better: etomidate or ketamine?
Phlegmasia Cerulea Dolens
Phlegmasia cerulea dolens is a rare but emergent condition of massive venous thrombosis that can rapidly produce irreversible vascular gangrene. If your patient in the emergency department has a swoll
Obtaining arterial access is a common procedure in both emergency medicine and in critical care. It's a good idea to become familiar with the axillary artery as an alternative location for placement o
Traumatic splenic injury and hemorrhage is a diagnosis familiar to most emergency physicians. However, a condition that some may not be familiar with is atraumatic splenic rupture.
Balloon tamponade devices specifically designed for upper GI bleeding are well-established as a temporizing measure in life-threatening upper gastrointestinal bleeding, but rarely have been used for l