Browsing: Ultrasound

Ovarian torsion, marked by pelvic and abdominal pain and considered a surgical emergency, can be difficult to diagnose but should not be overlooked, especially among pediatric patients.
AAAs are generally asymptomatic before rupture and often lethal due to delays in diagnosis and care, as most are missed for alternative diagnoses before hemodynamic compromise occurs. Traditional phys
Point-of-care ultrasound may be the best, and quickest, way to diagnose Fournier’s Gangrene, an acute necrotic infection of the perineal, genital, or perianal regions.
Knowing when to stop volume resuscitation in the unstable shock patient is a question that plagues both the emergency physician and the critical care doctor. VExUS was designed to succeed where CVP ha
Ultrasound is a powerful tool in the emergency department for the estimation of left ventricular ejection fractions. E-Point Septal Separation is a good way to obtain these measurements, but what if t
The need for a central line is commonplace in the emergency department and critical care units. When deciding which of the three typical sites (internal jugular, femoral, and subclavian) to choose for
Esophageal rupture is a rare condition that is recognized as one of the most fatal gastrointestinal injuries. Time to diagnosis is an independent predictor of mortality in acute esophageal rupture mak
Phlegmasia Cerulea Dolens
Phlegmasia cerulea dolens is a rare but emergent condition of massive venous thrombosis that can rapidly produce irreversible vascular gangrene. If your patient in the emergency department has a swoll
Ultrasound is a favored modality in emergency medicine. This case shows yet another application of this popular diagnostic tool - one involving subcutaneous larvae.
Obtaining arterial access is a common procedure in both emergency medicine and in critical care. It's a good idea to become familiar with the axillary artery as an alternative location for placement o