Browsing: Wilderness Medicine

Lyme disease is one of the most common vector-borne diseases in the United States, affecting over 300,000 people annually between June and December. This case report describes a less common cardiac ma
Post-pandemic vacations are picking up steam - and outdoor getaways remain popular. Are you ready to handle bites, stings, and other envenomations?
How can you safely get outdoors? What do you need to plan to stay safe? How can you spend time in the wilderness responsibly? What impact can you have on the health of our planet and its future after
Disaster medicine is a growing niche in emergency medicine. Two experts in the field, Paul Auerbach, MD, MS, FACEP, and Thomas Kirsch, MD, MPH, FACEP, share insights in this Q-and-A.
The presentation of motor weakness in children is often alarming, difficult to characterize, and involves a large differential of uncommon pathologies. Tick paralysis is a rare but important cause of
The Divers Alert Network records more than 1,000 diving-related injuries each year. Treatment for patients with decompression sickness should not be delayed.
Treating a rash that follows no pattern and appears after a vacation? Check for cutaneous larva migrans. Humans are accidental hosts who often acquire this infestation while walking barefoot on soil t
Pre-hospital groups like ski patrol provide a great opportunity for EM residents to lead cross-educational training days - while becoming more prepared themselves.
Since the dawn of time, biological life has been affected by the extremes of temperature. Wars have been won and lost due to the devastation brought on by hypothermia. Accidental hypothermia remains a
Although spider bite is a common complaint in the ED, systemic loxoscelism is a rare and deadly consequence of undiagnosed brown recluse bites. Use the NOT RECLUSE mnemonic to keep from missing it.