University of Cincinnati College of Medicine

The UC Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Cincinnati has been an independent academic unit within the College of Medicine since 1984. It is responsible for the medical direction of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Center for Emergency Care (CEC) and the Emergency Medicine Residency Training Program.

The UC Department of Emergency Medicine features the oldest residency training program in the United States and was founded in 1970. The UC Emergency Medicine department has enjoyed a reputation of excellence in the field for over 45 years and continues to attract top medical students. Nationally recognized faculty are leaders in clinical teaching and research.

As the first Emergency Medicine Resident Training Program established in 1970, our program attracts the country’s top medical students. We are proud of our clinical environments and happy to work in the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. The faculty of UC Emergency Physicians staff the Emergency Departments of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center (75,000 visits/year; 49% of direct admissions), the Jewish Hospital (30,500 visits/year; 79% of direct admissions), and the West Chester Hospital (42,000 visits/year; 65% of direct admissions) – total 147,500 patient visits/year.

Subarachnoid hemorrhage is a terrifying, relatively frequent cause of intracranial bleeding. It has a significant degree of morbidity and mortality - and therefore is a can't-miss diagnosis.
I did not sign up to be on the front lines of COVID. But I am humbled to put on my armor and return each day, because there is no greater honor in life than to step up during a time of need.
The start of a new academic year is full of anxiety as we all step into our new roles, regardless of what level we've reached in training. It's part of the medical maturation process.
If your care saves the patient but leaves their mind wounded, have you fully cared for the patient? Adopting a practice of premeditated compassion would allow us to offer our patients empathy reflexiv
Seemingly every social media outlet used by emergency medicine physicians-in-training blew up on Feb. 22 in response to a proposed non-physician emergency medicine "residency" training program at UNC.
We're pleased to introduce Christopher Zalesky, MD, MSc, chair-elect of the EMRA Research Committee, 2020-2021.
We're pleased to introduce Colleen Laurence, MD, MPH, chair of the EMRA International Committee, 2020-2021.
We're pleased to introduce Logan Ramsey, MD, vice chair of the EMRA Health Policy Committee, 2020-2021.
We're pleased to introduce Hamza Ijaz, MD, assistant vice chair of the EMRA Education Committee, 2020-2021.
EMRA President Dr. Hannah Hughes asks, "When the incoming class of EM residents open those envelopes this spring, how many will be plagued by the fear of a program’s insolvency? What are we - their se