Browsing: Op-Ed

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Understanding basic terminology, health disparities, and ED-specific concerns relevant to LGBTQIA+ patients is a timely and urgent task for emergency physicians. Studies have shown that provider incom
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Remunerated plasma donation remains a necessary unpleasantry. In response, we can bolster the voluntary systems that uphold our country’s current blood product supply by signing up for regularly sched
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As a second-year medical student who had been anxiously struggling with unanticipated medical expenses and no viable income, I thought about the upcoming months-long amount of time during which I woul
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People experiencing homelessness commonly present to the emergency department for health care needs, and the ED plays a crucial role, as it serves as the first — and often the only — resource for acce
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The ED is an important source of health care for immigrants and refugees/asylum seekers.1,2 Since the passing of EMTALA, the ED has functioned as the health care safety net for immigrants, especially
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Debriefing, leaning on peers, and seeking mental health help are all important steps in caring for unfavorable patients. Acknowledge the emotional toll that this may take on you, approach the situatio
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As I read and hear about other physicians in our specialty working through emotional burnout, I think that there must be something more we as a specialty can do for the next group of new physicians. B
International medical students face several challenges when they seek rotations in the United States. EMRA, along with our Medical Student Council, worked with relevant stakeholders — including EM pro
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Addiction is a disease that responds to treatment. We must offer services to all patients no matter how many times it takes them to accept help. Who’s to say that attempt number 30 isn’t the one that
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The next time you or I see a patient, let’s take a second to confirm the patient can adequately understand us. That may mean speaking slower, speaking louder, or making sure the patient has hearing ai