COVID-19: The EM Resident Perspective

COVID-19: The EM Resident Perspective

March 24, 2020

COVID-19 is affecting all of us in different ways. It can be a challenging time for residents, but you’re not alone. In this special episode, your EMRA*Cast hosts share their thoughts and stories as they navigate the constantly changing landscape of ER Medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Host

Jessie Werner, MD

University of California San Francisco – Fresno
Fellow - Emergency Medicine Education
@JessWernerMD
EMRA*Cast Episodes

Guests

Isaac Agboola, MD, MS

Yale New Haven Medical Center
PGY3
EMRA*Cast Episodes

Tiffany Proffitt, DO, MABS

Attending Physician
Honor Health, Scottsdale, AZ

@ProMammaDoc
EMRA*Cast Episodes
EM Resident Articles

Miguel A. Reyes, MD

Hackensack University Medical Center
PGY3
@miguel_reyesMD 
EMRA*Cast Episodes
EM Resident Articles

Overview

COVID-19 is affecting all of us in different ways. It can be a challenging time for residents, but you’re not alone. In this episode, your EMRA*Cast hosts share their thoughts and stories as they navigate the constantly changing landscape of ER Medicine during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Note: The things we discuss in this episode, while recorded this week, are changing hourly and daily. The resources listed below will help us all keep up-to-date.

Key Resources

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