Post-Roe: Caring for Patients in a Trigger Ban State

Post-Roe: Caring for Patients in a Trigger Ban State

Sept. 9, 2022

On June 24, 2022, the United States Supreme Court overturned the landmark decision Roe v. Wade, a legal precedent protecting a citizen's constitutional right to abortion. The highly politicized decision comes with significant consequences for those of us in health care – especially in states with abortion trigger bans. EMRA*Cast Host Shreyans Sanghvi, DO, joins EM Resident Editor-in-Chief Jessica Adkins Murphy, MD, (@DrAdkinsMurphy) to explore this deeply personal, subjective, and contentious topic.

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Host

Shreyans Sanghvi, DO

Fellow, medical education
UTHealth Houston McGovern Medical School
EMRA*Cast Episodes

Guest

Jessica Adkins Murphy, MD

EM Resident Editor-in-Chief, EMRA Board of Directors - 2021-2023
University of Kentucky Emergency Medicine Residency Program

@DrAdkinsMurphy

On June 24, 2022, the United States Supreme Court overturned the landmark decision Roe v. Wade, a legal precedent protecting a citizen’s constitutional right to abortion. The highly politicized decision comes with significant consequence for those of us in health care – especially in states with abortion trigger bans. EMRA*Cast Host Shreyans Sanghvi, DO, joins EM Resident Editor-in-Chief Jessica Adkins Murphy, MD, (@DrAdkinsMurphy) to explore this deeply personal, subjective, and contentious topic.


Overview
On June 24, 2022, the United States Supreme Court overturned the landmark decision Roe v. Wade, a legal precedent protecting a citizen's constitutional right to abortion. The highly politicized decision comes with significant consequences for those of us in health care – especially in states with abortion trigger bans.

Affecting not only pregnant patients, their families, and communities alike, this decision has also trespassed on the foundation of evidence-based reproductive health care. And, unlike many of the other decisions we make every day in our clinical practice of medicine, this clinical decision may often intersect with and challenge both our and our patients' faith, backgrounds, societal circumstances, and more.

EMRA*Cast Host Shreyans Sanghvi, DO, joins EM Resident Editor-in-Chief Jessica Adkins Murphy, MD, (@DrAdkinsMurphy) to explore this deeply personal, subjective, and contentious topic.

Further Reading

References

  1. Hoyert DL. Maternal Mortality Rates in the United States, 2020. CDC National Center for Health Statistics. Feb. 23, 2022.
  2. Hoyert DL. Health E-Stats: Maternal Mortality Rates in the United States, 2020. CDC National Center for Health Statistics. Feb. 23, 2022.
  3. Tikkanen R, Gunja MZ, FitzGerald M, Zephyrin L. Maternal Mortality and Maternity Care in the United States Compared to 10 Other Developed Countries. The Commonwealth Fund. Nov. 18, 2020.
  4. Melillo G. US Ranks Worst in Maternal Care, Mortality Compared with 10 Other Developed Nations. AJMC: The Center for Biosimilars. Dec. 3, 2020.
  5. Treisman R. States with the toughest abortion laws have the weakest maternal supports, data shows. NPR. Aug. 18, 2022.

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